Give a second chance…

Day by day

Give a second chance; be an organ donor
by
LIZ THOMPSON
THISWEEKNEWS.com
Tuesday July 23, 2013 12:38 PM

 

Second chances. Our parents lovingly gave them to us as we learned right from wrong while testing the limits of the boundaries set before us. We grow and learn to make better choices.

Some people won’t get second chances unless someone else makes a good choice — in most cases, a stranger. When we opt to be registered as an organ donor upon death, and no longer have need of our organs, we become a potential hero.

“When a person is put on a transplant list, it’s because their doctor has told him or her that they’ve run out of options,” said Don Huiner, of Columbus. “Their only hope is that an organ will become available. And if they do get that lifesaving organ, they get their second chance on life.”

Huiner is an ambassador for Lifeline of Ohio and has talked with people across Ohio about being an organ donor.

“What a lot of people don’t realize is that, just because you need an organ, you’re not necessarily going to get it. Someone has to say ‘yes’ and sign up to be an organ donor.”

Some person whose identity the recipient might never know.

More than 3,400 Ohioans are on transplant waiting lists. In 2012, only 297 Ohioans donated organs at the time of their death. According to Lifeline of Ohio, their “gifts resulted in 958 life-saving transplants.”

Kaitlyn Thompson, of Lifeline of Ohio, explained: “The heroes who register as organ, eye and tissue donors can save eight lives and heal up to 50 more by donating vital organs and tissue.” The organs that can be donated are the heart, lungs, kidneys, liver, pancreas and small bowel. Tissues able to be donated are corneas, bone, fascia, skin, veins, tendons and heart valves.

She explained and clarified the myths and misconceptions that can discourage people from registering as a donor in the Ohio Donor Registry. Some common myths include:

* Doctors and medical professionals won’t do everything to save my life if I’m an organ donor.

WRONG: The priority of the medical professionals at the hospital when an injury occurs is to save the patient’s life. A transplant team does not become involved until independent physicians have determined all possible efforts to save the life of the patient have failed and a time of death is announced. Doctors and hospital staff don’t even have access to the registry to see if the patient is a registered donor.

* My religion is against donation.

WRONG: In fact, all major U.S. religions support donation as the ultimate charitable gift of life and love. Individuals are encouraged to speak with their religious leaders about donation.

* I’m too old to donate.

WRONG: The truth is, you’re never too old to donate. The oldest donor to date was a 92-year-old who donated his liver to one of the more than 118,500 people waiting in the U.S. for a life-saving transplant. Anyone over the age of 151/2 can be a hero of donation by registering when they obtain/ renew their driver’s license or state I.D.

Individuals are encouraged to share their decision to donate with their families so they can help honor the person’s authorization to donate.

One of Huiner’s role models is his late daughter, Erika. After a courageous lifelong battle against the ravages of cystic fibrosis, Erika was listed for a transplant and waited three years before receiving two lungs on her 24th birthday. She lived a full and healthy life for nearly four years before dying of a cause unrelated to her transplant.

“Erika was not able to donate her organs but was a tissue donor and gave the gift of eyesight by donating her corneas,” he said.

Huiner remains in awe of the way Erika lived her life, but said it would be wrong to call her a hero. “The heroes of Erika’s story are the parents of a young girl who made the decision to donate their daughter’s organs so that four people, including Erika, could realize a new, healthy life.”

Not everyone who needs a transplant gets that second chance. Some die before an organ becomes available.

“In a perfect world, everyone who needs a lifesaving transplant should be able to get it. First, however, someone has to say ‘yes’ and sign up to be an organ donor. Everyone deserves that second chance at life,” Don said.

You can ask questions and register to be an organ, eye and tissue donor by visiting your local Bureau of Motor Vehicles agency, calling Lifeline of Ohio at 1-800-525-5667 or visiting lifeline ofohio.org.

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Technology lifts quality of life for those with hearing loss

Day by day

Technology lifts quality of life for those with hearing loss
By LIZ THOMPSON
THISWEEKNEWS.COM
Wednesday May 15, 2013 1:53 PM

The short of it: I became deaf.

The long of it: I learned how to cope.

Technology has become what was considered futuristic in the ’50s, when my hearing loss was discovered at age 9. It would be 30 years before my first hearing aid and 41 years before I was totally deaf and received my first cochlear implant. Four years ago, I had my second implant.

My ability to hear and understand speech and sounds went from 0 percent to almost 97 percent in a quiet setting. To be able to sit in a dark room and carry on a conversation was a miracle. I stand amazed and grateful for this technology.

I’m not alone in my hearing-loss struggles. According to Stanford School of Medicine, about 36 million American adults report some degree of hearing loss. Stanford also stated two out of every 1,000 babies in the United States are born deaf or hard of hearing, and close to a million children in America have hearing loss.

Kate Morris, 33, of Upper Arlington, is initiative coordinator for the Stanford Initiative to Cure Hearing Loss. The Stanford Initiative involves hearing-loss research investigations in four areas: stem cell therapy, gene therapy, molecular therapy and targeted neural stimulation.

She says she has “a wonderful 3-year-old who wears pink hearing aids.” Very cool. I’m thrilled her daughter, Lily, has possibilities for a better scenario than I had available as a girl.

“Because of the newborn hearing screening … in the hospital on the day she was born, we were able to catch Lily’s hearing loss very early and to have her fitted with her first pair of pink hearing aids at 7 weeks old,” Kate said. “Lily now speaks at a level above what is considered age appropriate, and currently attends speech therapy at the OSU Speech, Language and Hearing Clinic, but otherwise attends a mainstream preschool.”

Her family also feels “amazingly lucky to be dealing with hearing loss at a time when there is so much realistic hope for a cure, which could be beneficial for Lily or Lily’s children, should they have hearing loss, and that in the meantime, huge strides are being made in assistive technologies.”

Many obvious factors play into causes of hearing loss. Some include noise pollution from military service, industrial activity, illness and any prolonged high-decibel noise.

Hearing loss has side effects not often discussed. The Stanford Initiative, and most specialists, agree with my experience of withdrawing socially, being frustrated communicating with friends, family and coworkers, and facing depression and isolation. It’s easy to think you are the only one and, as the numbers tell, we are not.

Darryl Will, audiologist with Hearing Health Solution from OhioENT, says studies have linked untreated hearing loss to diminished psychological and overall health.

“Most recently, researchers have found that there is a direct relationship between the degree of hearing loss and the risk of later developing dementia or Alzheimer’s disease,” he said.

Will adds that “loss of hearing often coexists with other health problems and should not be ignored.”

With Stanford’s research, improvements in hearing aids and cochlear implants, children won’t need to wait years like my peers and I did.

Hermine Willey, 76, of east Columbus, has known of her hearing loss since she was 7. She got her first hearing aids in 1981 and now loves her digital hearing aids that allow her to be active in the hearing world.

Dave Scott of Upper Arlington marks his birth as “after Benny Goodman’s Carnegie Hall concert and before we entered World War II.” His sense of humor intact, he has sported hearing aids since December.

Wendy Brady, 44, of northwest Columbus, wears hearing aids as she waits to become a candidate for a cochlear implant. Her hope is that she will hear her young children with a clarity that is missing now.

Pat Vincent, 64, of Columbus knew of his hearing loss at 14 due to Meniere’s disease. He now has a cochlear implant.

We all encourage being proactive and finding support through organizations such as Hearing Loss Association of America or Association of Late Deafened Adults. Since 1927, the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association has spotlighted May — Better Hearing and Speech Month — as “a time to encourage Americans to get their hearing tested and determine if they have a hearing loss.”

Anything sound familiar? I encourage you to learn how to get your hearing checked at these websites: hearinghealthsolutions. com; speechhearingclinic. osu.edu; or columbusspeech.org.

Local author Liz Thompson writes the Day by day column for ThisWeek News. Reach her at lizt911@gmail.com.

Simple Gifts

High schooler believes in power of a simple gift
By LIZ THOMPSON
THISWEEKNEWS.COM
Thursday January 3, 2013 11:40 AM

She sees God in simple gifts.

“I trust in God more than ever (now) and make my decisions by His word and what He would do rather than what’s popular or what I want,” Kristina Myers of Grove City said. This year she was coordinator for Operation Christmas Child for her church, St. John’s Lutheran in Grove City.

Simple gifts, yes, but not simple decisions or tasks.

Kristina shadowed the coordinator of this project last year and knew that in order to do that job, she had to make some decisions. When she was not able to help as much as she wanted due to marching band competitions, she opted to drop band.

“I was sad to give up marching band, but I knew that this was the plan God had for me,” she said.

The Central Crossing High School sophomore chose instead to run cross country. Her coach, Doug Boggs, never blinked an eye when he learned what she was doing at her church.

“God provided me with an awesome coach who totally believes in Operation Christmas Child and putting God first,” Kristina said. “I never had to miss a meet but I did have to leave practice early quite a few times for things regarding this project. My coach was always very supportive.”

Doug said Kristina is a great person and hard worker, no matter what she’s doing.

“It truly has been a blessing to have Kristina and her family become a part of the cross country and track programs. Kristina’s mom and dad have been great helping out with the team needs. It’s obvious to see where Kristina gets her kind and giving spirit,” Boggs said.

This project, founded in 1990, is led by Samaritan’s Purse, an organization founded in 1970, to give kids all over the world something they normally wouldn’t have — a Christmas. Kristina said that churches and people across the United States take a simple shoebox, fill it with items that include toys, hygiene items, school supplies, other small items like socks or sunglasses and sometimes a personal note.

“This project is bigger than just shoebox gifts; it’s the power of a simple gift. This one shoebox brings the word of God into the life of a child.”

The work is done and Kristina Myers can look back with a grateful heart.

“If I had to thank one specific person it would be (one of my youth leaders) Laurie Pecuch or my mom,” Kristina said. “Mom taught me to love God, helped with transportation and anything that needed done.

“Laurie was a big help when it came to planning, organizing, getting in touch with others, and making the project something our whole church was excited to participate in.”

Pecuch said, “She is devoted to helping children in poverty-stricken countries know first-hand the joy that comes from receiving a gift of love at Christmas. Her devotion, sacrifice, and time spent in leading this project are noteworthy. She collected 169 shoeboxes full of gifts and love.”

Although Kristina coordinated these efforts, she said her family and friends provided invaluable support and flexibility. The church’s high school and middle school youth shopped and had a packing party. They put donated items and things they purchased with money gifts into the decorated shoe boxes, checking to make sure everything was ready before they were dropped off at Upper Arlington Lutheran Church — the official drop-off location.

The boxes soon were on their journey to a child somewhere in the world.

The idea that Christmas is a time for giving is nothing new to Americans. Often the gift giving and wish lists get out of hand and we don’t worry so much about the national debt as our own debt.

What do we have to sacrifice to buy the gifts on our list? Or should we simply rethink our gift giving and consider the real reason we have Christmas?

Kristina made her choice knowing the recipients will never know her name. She has heard stories how one shoebox changed a child’s life.

“I am so blessed to be able to show God’s love to others through this project, and tell people I don’t even know that I love them and that they have a Father in heaven who loves them even more. This project is life-changing.”

That’s what Christmas is about.

Interview

Read my interview at this link: http://www.sellingbooks.com/elizabeth-thompson-author-interview 

Be sure and check the other author interviews. One in particular, Donna Schillinger who is a good friend, great writer and editor. Also, a fellow Christian.

Writer Advice, with a twist Part 2…

25 Golden Rules for Writing Well

  1. Don’t abbrev.
  2. Check to see if you any words out.
  3. Be carefully to use adjectives and adverbs correct.
  4. About sentence fragments.
  5. When dangling, don’t use participles.
  6. Don’t use no double negatives.
  7. Each pronoun agrees with their antecedent.
  8. Just between you and I, case is important.
  9. Join clauses good, like a conjunction should.
  10. Don’t use commas, that aren’t necessary.
  11. Its important to use apostrophe’s right.
  12. It’s better not to unnecessarily split an infinitive.
  13. Never leave a transitive verb just lay there without an object.
  14. Only Proper Nouns should be capitalized. also a sentence should begin with a capital letter and end with a full stop
  15. Use hyphens in compound-words, not just in any two-word phrase.
  16. In letters compositions reports and things like that we use commas to keep a string of items apart.
  17. Watch out for irregular verbs that have creeped into our language.
  18. Verbs has to agree with their subjects.
  19. Avoid unnecessary redundancy.
  20. A writer mustn’t shift your point of view.
  21. Don’t write a run-on sentence you’ve got to punctuate it.
  22. A preposition isn’t a good thing to end a sentence with.
  23. Avoid cliches like the plague.
  24. 1 final thing is to never start a sentence with a number.
  25. Always check your work for accuracy and completeness.

Author unknown

Fourth Graders at Grove City Christian School

The students of Sarah Stedtefeld read the book The Landry News by Andrew Clements. She asked if I would talk with them about writing for a newspaper. It was a great time and these – very tall – 4th graders were polite, enthusiastic and asked great questions.

Here they are and I’m the short one with gray hair in the back.