Event will help seniors clear tech’s hurdles

Day by Day: Event will help seniors clear tech’s hurdles

By LIZ THOMPSON

August 11, 2019

This Week News

When we reach age 55, we are considered senior citizens.

That means we can join a senior center and receive discounts at stores.

Those of us born between 1944 and 1964 often are called baby boomers. We came of age before computers were in homes and certainly before we could hold one in our hand or on our lap.

Most of us, and definitely those born earlier, remember the first TV in our homes, and some remember party lines on telephones. Rarely did we have more than one telephone or TV in our homes. We set what was called rabbit-ear antennae on top of the TV and moved them around to get a fairly good black-and-white picture.

Over the years, we became aware of technology seeping into our daily lives. Those of us fortunate enough to work where we learned our way around computers have a fair advantage over those who did not. We grew into the knowledge, making the advances less traumatic.

Even if senior citizens find technology confusing or frustrating, it can help some stay in their home longer and more safely. It’s called “aging in place,” meaning a person lives and ages in their residence of choice for as long as they are able.

Aging in place includes having services, care and needed support in the residence.

But the idea meets some hurdles in the health, social and emotional needs that must be addressed to help people maintain well-rounded lives.

The Upper Arlington (Ohio) Commission on Aging understands these challenges and offers an annual symposium on different topics to inform senior citizens.

This year, the topic is “Technology and Aging: What You Need to Know and What You Want to Know.”

Presentations will include “Aging and your Health Care” and “Aging in Place.”

This year’s symposium is set from 8:30 a.m. to 1 p.m Sept. 18 at Upper Arlington Lutheran Church, 2300 Lytham Road.

From 8:30 to 9 a.m., those who attend may view exhibits from technology groups, companies and other related sponsors with the Upper Arlington Commission on Aging.

The free event includes lunch.

Registration is required, and the deadline is Sept. 11. To register, call 614-407-5748 or go to uacoa.com and use the “contact us” form.

Featured speakers are Donna Matturri, technology and media librarian with the Upper Arlington Public Library, and Danielle Murphy, consumer educator from Attorney General David Yost’s office.

“We hear so much in the news about the worst possible outcomes in technology: identity theft, hacking, fake news,” Matturri said. “When you have to sort through all that negative noise, it feels nearly impossible to stay positive about using a smartphone or computer.

“Technology can connect us to family and friends (and help us make new friends), keep us organized, help us stay safe and active and, through your local library’s resources, entertain you.”

Murphy will inform guests about the Cybersecurity, Help, Information and Protection Program.

“The presentation is a basic educational session designed to help consumers stay safe in cyberspace,” she said. “As consumers of all ages rely more and more on technology, it is vital they understand how to protect their electronic devices and keep personal information private.”

Murphy said her presentation will focus on the importance of security and privacy, including the special challenges brought by mobile devices.

She will offer seniors practical security and privacy tips they can put to use and will provide copies of the CHIPP booklet to all who attend.

This booklet is available at ohioattorneygeneral.gov by clicking on “publications” and looking for the CHIPP under the “consumers” header. The booklet also can be ordered by calling 800-282-0515.

A panel, moderated by Age-Friendly Columbus, will feature representatives from Nesterly, Smart Columbus and Lyft.

The forum is open to all senior citizens.

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