Big volunteer results

Day by day

Big volunteer results grow from tiny start
By Liz Thompson
THIS WEEK NEWS
April 16, 2013

In 1970, a group of doctors’ wives in Grove City wanted to raise money to help battle cancer. More women joined the cause. Many were what we called housewives in those days. Again, don’t underestimate.

Mary Crane, of Grove City, was one of the originals. “Cancer was coming to the forefront and not going away anytime soon,” she said. “We wanted to help.” They started with fundraisers such as bake sales and card parties.

“We heard that a couple other towns were starting thrift shops to raise money,” Mary said. They followed the example and rented a little store on Broadway next to an auction house. The first year they made $500. In 2012, they donated $31,745 to the cause.

They moved a couple times for better space. In the last decade, they opted to send their monies to the Columbus Cancer Clinic, begun in 1921, and in 2005 became an agency of LifeCare Alliance, which provides services to seniors across the region.

“We met with them and were impressed and decided to go with them. The Worthington and Reynoldsburg shops decided to do the same thing,” Mary said.

The Columbus Cancer Clinic is Medicare-certified and provides education about cancer prevention and early detection, head-to-toe cancer screenings, examinations and mammograms, regardless of patients’ ability to pay. In 2011, the program served 3,469 clients providing 1,593 mammograms, 1,163 head-to-toe cancer screenings, and 713 clients with home care support services.

Linda Sharp, retired, who has been a volunteer for almost 10 years, said it feels good to give to the clinic because it helps people locally. “If someone needs a wig, because of their treatments, they can go there and get one.”

Shirley Barnes of Grove City, recruited by Mary Crane, loved working the shop for 37 years. The second year, she was asked to be president and said they needed more help and they formed a board of volunteers. “We didn’t even have a sign yet.”

“We hoped to find a cure but didn’t realize at the time there were so many types (of cancer), she said. “I believed in the cause.”

The Grove City Thrift Shop, located off the north side of Stringtown Road at 3684 Garden Court, is not easy to find. But once you do, little treasures abound. It’s not just about the trinkets or clothes you might find; it’s the people who will help you. Volunteers are what make this trip worth it.

After a little shopping, I got easy answers to my question, “Why do you volunteer here?” The overriding answer is because cancer touched their lives. The volunteers are giving back.

Shirley says she always got more out of working at the shop than she put into it. “The stories customers would tell us about people in their lives with cancer, well I think they felt safe telling us. If we volunteered there, we must have compassion.”

Betty Lewis of Columbus, a retired school secretary with South-Western City Schools, has volunteered since 1995. Her mother and mother-in-law had cancer.

Sue Shilling, of Mt. Sterling, said her husband and mother had cancer. She was a frequent shopper there but after retirement, she wanted to contribute to a worthy cause.

Dorothy Lanch, of Orient, has a little more than a year under her belt at the shop. “I felt like I’d been here for years the moment I walked in the door as a volunteer,” she said. A friend died from cancer and breast cancer is in her family. “I wanted to do something worthwhile after working in the corporate world for 41 years,” Dorothy said. She retired from Nationwide Insurance. “It’s shattering to see someone retire and months later they are gone, just like that,” she said, referring to her friend.

Sharon Downing of Grove City, a 37-year volunteer, said, “It’s a business and there is a lot of background work these self-giving volunteers do. We have lost some volunteers to cancer and some of our volunteers are cancer survivors.” Sharon and her family have struggled with the disease.

There are more than 50 shop volunteers with this passion to give back. I wish I could name them all, but that’s not why they do this.

Mary said, “No matter what you do, or how you do it, or when you do it, you can help fight cancer.”

For more information about donations, consignments or volunteering, call the Grove City Thrift Shop at 614-871-1126. Find out more about LifeCare Alliance at lifecare alliance.org.

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Where two or more…

Today I did a book discussion at the E.L. Evans Center in Grove City, Ohio. Most of the members were busy having fun playing cards and it was good to see the friendship in action.

Three had signed up to join in the book discussion of my newest book, God Whispers: Nudges, Fudges and Butterfly Moments.  The weather is blustery today and I think it deterred the third from joining us. After we had been talking for about 45 minutes or so, I said I love the Bible verse that says something like, “Where two or more are gathered in my name…” and I looked it up to make sure:

Matthew 18:20
For where two or three gather in my name, there am I with them.”

I remember a Bible song that runs in my head with this verse and find it comforting.

So today Francine, Ginny and I had a discussion about many issues in our world today and listened as we each talked from our experiences about the times God has nudged us into action, times we fudged our reaction and times we knew we had succeeded, with God’s help, to shed the trappings of this world to be free like a butterfly when it sheds it cocoon, or chrysalis.

It really matters not how many gather to discuss how God has sustained us and blessed us in our lives. In encourage you to do this when you have the opportunity.

Here we are:

L-R: Francine, Ginny and Liz (me)

L-R: Francine, Ginny and Liz (me)

People with MS thrive with help, wait for cure

People with MS thrive with help, wait for cure

By                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                     LIZ THOMPSON                                                                                        

ThisWeek Community NewsTuesday March 26, 2013 1:03 PM

My ankle turned and I landed in the bushes. Four people were there in seconds to help. True, I was outside our church but this has been my experience for as long as I can remember. I fall, people help. Embarrassment happens but I move on.

About 12 years ago, I wrote a column about falling in a crosswalk in downtown Columbus. The editor titled it The people of Columbus are still picking me up. This is true literally and figuratively. Strangers helped me in that crosswalk the same as my friends did last month. I’m convinced people are kindhearted and when they are able, choose to help others.

Often people aren’t sure when and how to help. These strangers and friends who helped me followed their instincts. Our attitude is one thing we can control and makes a difference in tense situations. I’m always appreciative of any help that comes my way making it easier on everyone.

Most of those I know with Multiple Sclerosis, like me, have led active and independent lives.

An MS diagnosis can knock the breath out of us and we wonder, “What’s next?” We eventually learn it’s time to ask for help whether it be information or a helping hand. In time we realize life goes on and MS isn’t always the first topic in conversation. Adapt becomes our middle name and we begin to see how to do most everything we choose but in a different way. Some things must be shelved as not worthy of our time, too risky or labor intensive.

When I was diagnosed with MS in 1987, there were no what we call “disease modifying” drugs proven to slow the progression of this neurological disease. There was no Internet and very few books published on living with the disease. So I muddled through like thousands of others had for many years.

Today someone newly diagnosed could easily become overwhelmed with information and his or her “what’s next?” takes on new meaning. We learn to weed out what works for us and learn how to get through in our own way; on our own path because each person’s MS is different. Each person is different.

James Rhodes, 43, of Powell, is a state-certified referee for high school basketball and football games. He was an amateur bodybuilder preparing for a 2005 body-building competition in New York when he experienced his first symptoms. Debilitating fatigue struck and next he suffered a stroke. This led to a lot of tests and his official diagnosis of MS. He had four months of rehabilitation.

Did he fall down and not want to get up? Or did he get up and let his friends and family help him and stand by him? He is so grateful for the latter experience. The support of his family, especially his wife, Kymberly, who has been by his side through the good and the bad times, has made all his struggles bearable.

He continues his role as a referee but took a step down in responsibilities at his workplace. He and his wife have five children between them and take each day at a time.

Thankfully, people like James and I have the National MS Society. Because of valuable research, there are now eight ADA-approved MS drugs with more on the horizon every year. Research is costly. MS is a chronic, often disabling and unpredictable disease of the central nervous system with no known cause or cure. Theory is if we find a cause, the cure would follow.

It’s not known why Ohio has a high prevalence rate of MS but the MS Society is finding out by funding more than $6.3 million in critical MS research at Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland Clinic Foundation and the Ohio State University. Progress has been made toward finding ways to improve symptoms and restore function.

The more than 20,000 Ohioans we know have MS have a voice speaking for them with the Ohio Buckeye Chapter and two other Ohio chapters of the National MS Society. I volunteer with them to help give a face to MS and to speak for those who cannot. Volunteers and staff are busy year-round planning activities, contacting legislators, advocating for those of us with MS.

March is MS Awareness Month. There are at least 20,000 stories in Ohio that I could tell about living with MS. That number increases when including their families, friends and coworkers. MS affects them all.

For more information, call 1-800-FIGHTMS or go to MSohiobuckeye.org