Carrots, Eggs, or Coffee?

I have read this as a young woman asking her mother, her grandmother and her father; so I’m not sure which is correct. But the message is clear.

Grandmother Says… Carrots, Eggs, or Coffee; “Which are you?”

A young woman went to her grandmother and told her about her life and how things were so hard for her. She did not know how she was going to make it and wanted to give up. She was tired of fighting and struggling. It seemed as one problem was solved a new one arose.

Her grandmother took her to the kitchen. She filled three pots with water. In the first, she placed carrots, in the second she placed eggs and the last she placed ground coffee beans. She let them sit and boil without saying a word.

In about twenty minutes she turned off the burners. She fished the carrots out and placed them in a bowl. She pulled the eggs out and placed them in a bowl. Then she ladled the coffee out and placed it in a bowl. Turning to her granddaughter, she asked, “Tell me what do you see?”

 “Carrots, eggs, and coffee,” she replied.

She brought her closer and asked her to feel the carrots. She did and noted that they got soft.She then asked her to take an egg and break it.

After pulling off the shell, she observed the hard-boiled egg.

Finally, she asked her to sip the coffee. The granddaughter smiled, as she tasted its rich aroma. The granddaughter then asked. “What’s the point, grandmother?”

Her grandmother explained that each of these objects had faced the same adversity–boiling water–but each reacted differently.

The carrot went in strong, hard and unrelenting. However after being subjected to the boiling water, it softened and became weak. The egg had been fragile. Its thin outer shell had protected its liquid interior. But, after sitting through the boiling water, its inside became hardened.

The ground coffee beans were unique, however. After they were in the boiling water they had changed the water.

“Which are you?” she asked her granddaughter.

“When adversity knocks on your door, how do you respond? Are you a carrot, an egg, or a coffee bean?”

Think of this: Which am I?

Am I the carrot that seems strong, but with pain and adversity, do I wilt and become soft and lose my strength?

Am I the egg that starts with a malleable heart, but changes with the heat? Did I have a fluid spirit, but after a death, a breakup, a financial hardship or some other trial, have I become hardened and stiff?

Does my shell look the same, but on the inside am I bitter and tough with a stiff spirit and a hardened heart?

Or am I like the coffee bean? The bean actually changes the hot water, the very circumstance that brings the pain. When the water gets hot, it releases the fragrance and flavor. If you are like the bean, when things are at their worst, you get better and change the situation around you.

When the hours are the darkest and trials are their greatest do you elevate to another level?

How do you handle adversity? Are you a carrot, an egg, or a coffee bean?

The happiest of people don’t necessarily have the best of everything; they just make the best of things that come their way.

—AUTHOR UNKNOWN —

We are troubled on every side, yet not distressed; we are perplexed, but
not in despair; Persecuted, but not forsaken; cast down, but not destroyed.
II Corinthians 4:8-9

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Simple Gifts

High schooler believes in power of a simple gift
By LIZ THOMPSON
THISWEEKNEWS.COM
Thursday January 3, 2013 11:40 AM

She sees God in simple gifts.

“I trust in God more than ever (now) and make my decisions by His word and what He would do rather than what’s popular or what I want,” Kristina Myers of Grove City said. This year she was coordinator for Operation Christmas Child for her church, St. John’s Lutheran in Grove City.

Simple gifts, yes, but not simple decisions or tasks.

Kristina shadowed the coordinator of this project last year and knew that in order to do that job, she had to make some decisions. When she was not able to help as much as she wanted due to marching band competitions, she opted to drop band.

“I was sad to give up marching band, but I knew that this was the plan God had for me,” she said.

The Central Crossing High School sophomore chose instead to run cross country. Her coach, Doug Boggs, never blinked an eye when he learned what she was doing at her church.

“God provided me with an awesome coach who totally believes in Operation Christmas Child and putting God first,” Kristina said. “I never had to miss a meet but I did have to leave practice early quite a few times for things regarding this project. My coach was always very supportive.”

Doug said Kristina is a great person and hard worker, no matter what she’s doing.

“It truly has been a blessing to have Kristina and her family become a part of the cross country and track programs. Kristina’s mom and dad have been great helping out with the team needs. It’s obvious to see where Kristina gets her kind and giving spirit,” Boggs said.

This project, founded in 1990, is led by Samaritan’s Purse, an organization founded in 1970, to give kids all over the world something they normally wouldn’t have — a Christmas. Kristina said that churches and people across the United States take a simple shoebox, fill it with items that include toys, hygiene items, school supplies, other small items like socks or sunglasses and sometimes a personal note.

“This project is bigger than just shoebox gifts; it’s the power of a simple gift. This one shoebox brings the word of God into the life of a child.”

The work is done and Kristina Myers can look back with a grateful heart.

“If I had to thank one specific person it would be (one of my youth leaders) Laurie Pecuch or my mom,” Kristina said. “Mom taught me to love God, helped with transportation and anything that needed done.

“Laurie was a big help when it came to planning, organizing, getting in touch with others, and making the project something our whole church was excited to participate in.”

Pecuch said, “She is devoted to helping children in poverty-stricken countries know first-hand the joy that comes from receiving a gift of love at Christmas. Her devotion, sacrifice, and time spent in leading this project are noteworthy. She collected 169 shoeboxes full of gifts and love.”

Although Kristina coordinated these efforts, she said her family and friends provided invaluable support and flexibility. The church’s high school and middle school youth shopped and had a packing party. They put donated items and things they purchased with money gifts into the decorated shoe boxes, checking to make sure everything was ready before they were dropped off at Upper Arlington Lutheran Church — the official drop-off location.

The boxes soon were on their journey to a child somewhere in the world.

The idea that Christmas is a time for giving is nothing new to Americans. Often the gift giving and wish lists get out of hand and we don’t worry so much about the national debt as our own debt.

What do we have to sacrifice to buy the gifts on our list? Or should we simply rethink our gift giving and consider the real reason we have Christmas?

Kristina made her choice knowing the recipients will never know her name. She has heard stories how one shoebox changed a child’s life.

“I am so blessed to be able to show God’s love to others through this project, and tell people I don’t even know that I love them and that they have a Father in heaven who loves them even more. This project is life-changing.”

That’s what Christmas is about.

Start the year with great care

Newborn's Feet Cradled in Parent's Hand

I get lazy. My relationships are important to me but at times I say things I know I shouldn’t. For what purpose if they aren’t loving? Selfish purposes.

Once I read something by Erma Bombeck about how if she had life to live over she would do things differently. Burn the fancy candle before it melted on its own; get grass stains on her clothes because she was playing with her children and not sweat the small stuff. Who really cares which way the TP hangs? I mean, really.

So recently my tendency to be critical was flashed in my face. The little things that I should ignore. I knew I’d been caught and there was no escape. So what did I do?

I begged forgiveness and admitted I needed to change, not the other way around.

It was scary, really, realizing I was really wrong and there was no escape. But I didn’t really want an escape, I wanted to move on more healthy – more ready to see the best and ignore the silly stuff.

With God’s help, I was able to move on and the sleep is better, the sun is brighter and even the cold, cold weather and snow inspires me to remember; remember no one, especially me, is perfect and never will be.

So I’m not sweating the small stuff and it’s a much more enjoyable walk in this life.

Thank God.