Love for pets connects us with humans

Day by Day: Love for pets connects us with humans

By LIZ THOMPSON

November 3, 2019

This Week News

We know unconditional love when a warm, furry pet in the shape of a dog or cat cuddles with us.

It has been proven that such cuddles lower blood pressure and ease feelings of loneliness.

Over the years, my family has kept myriad dogs and cats as pets. Many of our family stories – happy and sad – revolve around these animals. We are not alone in this.

While camping in Great Smoky Mountains National Park in Tennessee last month, my husband, Bob, and I met people from Alabama, Georgia, Florida, Kentucky, Virginia and, of course, Tennessee. Still others we talked with but never learned their home state.

Our dog, Toby, was a perfect conversation starter during walks. He is friendly and loves meeting new people, as do we.

Lou and Dan Farrow from Sugar Tree, Tennessee, told us they have owned three dogs: Queenie, Duchess and Princess. Despite the royal names, one was “an all-American mutt,” Lou said; the other two were Keeshonds.

Dan went into their trailer to get a photo of Princess, their last dog. The beautiful animal was perched on his favorite rock, Dan told us.

“It’s right down this road,” he said. “She would go there every time we walked.”

Princess has been gone two years, yet they spoke of her as if she might be nearby.

We understood and we talked about our past dogs, too, with the same affection and sweet memories.

As we spoke, Toby was waiting patiently in a pile of leaves, facing toward our campsite.

“I think he is ready to go h-o-m-e,” I said, spelling the last word.

Dan and Lou both laughed and said they had to do the same thing with their dogs: spell such words as treat, ride and walk.

That’s because saying certain words made our dogs anticipate that action.

We joke that Toby has learned to spell, so we need to change such words as walk to stroll.

A veterinarian told me years ago that dogs can learn up to 100 words, but I didn’t ask if they could learn to spell.

Sunny was an 8-year-old golden retriever we met with his owner from Tennessee. I guessed they were from the Volunteer State because their canopies and coats were all orange.

An Ohioan might have scarlet and gray.

I didn’t get the owner’s name, but she told me Sunny was a little skittish and didn’t leave her side often.

Her story reminds us that we provide comfort for our dogs, too. I know Toby is happiest when Bob and I are with him.

William and Tamarra from Spottsville, Kentucky, talked about Buster, their black Lab, when they walked onto our campsite to meet us. While Tamarra petted Toby, William pulled out his phone to show us photos of Buster.

“He traveled with us for 12 years,” William said. “We were actually in this campsite last time we were here with him.”

That was two years ago; sadly, Buster is gone.

Kristina Reed of Virginia camped next to us for a few days.

It was her first time camping without her daughter, now in college.

She especially loved seeing Toby because she had to leave her dachshund home with a friend. She hikes, and no dogs are allowed on trails.

Kristina shared photos of her dogs, including one who died a couple of months ago.

Dogs and cats are with us for a short time.

They give us many reasons to be thankful they walked into our lives, offering comfort and reasons to smile and remember.

On the morning we were leaving, William came to say goodbye. He had watched us with Toby, and when Toby gave him a doggie goodbye, William said, “You sure do get attached, don’t ya?”

That we do.

 

Bob, Toby and me in the Smokies

Ever-evolving class reunions ‘bittersweet’

Day by Day: Ever-evolving class reunions ‘bittersweet’

By LIZ THOMPSON

Oct 6, 2019
This Week News
 

Some people might wonder why, 50 years after my high school graduation, any of my 370 classmates would want to reunite.

But some 68 graduates from Westerville (South) High School (Ohio) did just that in August.

Many of my classmates traveled all 12 years – 13 if you count kindergarten – alongside each other. If we didn’t attend the same elementary school, we knew some classmates at our church, in Girl Scouts or Boy Scouts, Campfire Girls or through mutual friends.

Surely, we all spent many hours at Jaycee swimming pool, which opened in 1958, or Glengarry’s round swimming pool, which closed in 1979. I would miss the center diving board at Glengarry, but my siblings and I could ride our bikes or walk to Jaycee – and they had swim teams.

But like most children, we wanted to be refreshed with cool water during our summer days.

I remember classmate Dee Weaston Standish’s sister, Diane, giving us each a nickel to jump off the high board. A nickel would buy us a candy bar. Westerville was a typical small town, like so many in the 1950s and ’60s across America.

One draw to the reunion for me was all these shared memories that made us who we are. We might not have a lot in common today, but we easily laughed at our junior high photos and memories of living in a small town.

We were thrown back in time when Ron Kenreich, music director during our senior year, led us in singing “Happy Birthday to You” to Nancy Lindsay Coder.

Dee, the reunion chairperson, asked, “Mr. Kenreich, will you lead us in singing ‘Happy Birthday?’ ”

Without a moment’s hesitation, Ron raised his arms and motioned for us to sing. I felt 17 again, as I’m sure the others did, too. My guess is that Ron also felt younger.

Music is a great memory keeper. Ron had been teaching only a few years when he walked into our school to lead us in a glorious year of music.

Dee, now living in Marietta, told me later why she thought the reunion was so special.

“As life gets in the way with work, family, children and grandchildren, I find it hard to see all the classmates I would like to see,” she said. “The two evenings we spent together were a wonderful opportunity to see so many friends. The years melted away with smiles, hugs and laughter.

“Five years is too long to wait to do it again.”

Our class has held reunions many times in five-year intervals. Now we are talking about a 70th birthday party in two years. I’m sure the idea will gain momentum as 2021 nears.

Classmate Jeff Fields moved to Nevada 30 years ago and saw major changes and growth in his hometown.

“Being so far away, our reason for attending was to see our old hometown and the friends who made it such a great place to grow up,” Jeff said. “The irony of it all was saying ‘hi,’ getting a hug and sharing a memory but silently knowing that ‘goodbye’ was also being said. But it was worth every minute.”

Barbara West Rood, in Westerville, said she agreed with Dr. Seuss’s question, “How did it get so late so soon?”

“Seems as though it was just a short time ago at previous reunions we were discussing who married who, careers, children and fun times,” Barbara said. “Further down the line, the discussions became about grandchildren, retirement, travel plans and maybe caring for parents.

“The most recent reunion became Paul Harvey’s “The Rest of the Story” for me. It was the same personality, laugh and smile in friends that I knew from 50-plus years ago.”

I chose to use my cane and not my walker at the reunion. But two classmates used walkers and one was on oxygen.

Physical aging evident, we keep going.

“It was so good to catch up and bittersweet in a way knowing that time is catching up with all of us,” Barbara said, “but, thank God, we’ll get new bodies and another, even sweeter reunion someday.”

 

Class of 1969, Westerville (Ohio) High School

Handcrafted bowls, filled, fight hunger

Handcrafted bowls, filled, fight hunger

By LIZ THOMPSON
September 8, 2019
This Week News

The analogy of whether a partial glass of water is half-full or half-empty has been around for generations.

I heard it when a college classmate had interviewed for the Peace Corps. The interviewer wanted to know if she was an optimist or a pessimist. I’m guessing the half-empty applicants did not make the cut.

But what if we are looking at an empty soup bowl? Is it empty because we just finished eating a hot bowl of soup? Or was it never filled to begin with?

“Hunger,” according to Feeding America, “refers to a personal, physical sensation of discomfort, while food insecurity refers to a lack of available financial resources for food at the level of the household.”

The nonprofit organization adds that one in eight Americans are food-insecure.

According to farmingtofighthunger.com, 41 million people struggle with hunger in the United States, including 13 million children. Teachers state that 62% of students come to school hungry, the website says.

Central Ohio is not immune to food insecurity. According to a 2018 article by Rita Price in The Columbus Dispatch, one-third of families in Columbus experience it.

Locally, people are working to help put food on people’s tables and in their bowls.

That’s where Empty Bowls, an international movement that began about three decades ago and in which many communities participate, comes in.

Now in its 22nd year, a local Empty Bowls project has raised more than $275,000 for the Mid-Ohio Foodbank.

“As part of an international fight against hunger, ceramic bowls are made by Columbus (Ohio) Recreation and Parks staff, volunteers and partners of all ages and then put on display at our partner locations,” said Wendy Frantz, Empty Bowls project coordinator and recreation administrative manager.

For a $10 minimum donation, the public is invited to select a bowl and enjoy a meal of homemade soup and bread, Frantz said.

The project is a collaborative effort among the Columbus Recreation and Parks Department, several churches and a variety of businesses and program sponsors, she said.

I still have the ceramic bowl made by a girl in the Grove City Parks and Recreation Department in 2000, the first time I attended an Empty Bowls event. Last year, I purchased another. (See photo below.)

“The funds are nonrestricted funds, meaning they go toward feeding hungry neighbors and can potentially cover other expenses that will allow the food bank to operate,” said Malik Perkins, public relations manager for the Mid-Ohio Foodbank. “When funds are used to purchase food, $1 can buy up to $10 in groceries for the people we serve.

“We are thankful to have a network of generous people who are willing to join us in our fight to end hunger.”

People of all ages can make a bowl at several community centers. Events include:

‒ Woodward Park Community Center, 5147 Karl Road, Columbus, 1 to 2:30 and 7 to 8:30 p.m. Thursdays through Oct. 24.

‒ Far East Community Center, 1826 Lattimer Drive, Columbus, with parent/child bowl-making classes at 6:15 p.m. Tuesdays in October.

‒ Tuttle Park Community Center, 240 W. Oakland Ave., Columbus, 7 to 8:30 p.m. Thursdays, Sept. 19 through Oct. 17.

‒ Martin Janis Community Senior Center, 600 E. 11th Ave., Columbus, 2 to 4:30 p.m. Wednesdays through Oct. 30.

After the bowls are completed, events to sell the bowls and enjoy soup and bread begin. Events on Nov. 2 include:

‒ Parkview United Methodist Church, 344 S. Algonquin Ave., Columbus, 11 a.m. to 2 p.m.

‒ Tuttle Park Community Center, 11 a.m. to 2 p.m.

‒ Woodward Park Community Center, 11 a.m. to 1 p.m.

‒ Beautiful Savior Lutheran Church, 2213 White Road, Grove City, 11 a.m. to 2 p.m.

For more events and details, go to columbus.gov/emptybowls

My two bowls: L – 2018 and R – 2000

Event will help seniors clear tech’s hurdles

Day by Day: Event will help seniors clear tech’s hurdles

By LIZ THOMPSON

August 11, 2019

This Week News

When we reach age 55, we are considered senior citizens.

That means we can join a senior center and receive discounts at stores.

Those of us born between 1944 and 1964 often are called baby boomers. We came of age before computers were in homes and certainly before we could hold one in our hand or on our lap.

Most of us, and definitely those born earlier, remember the first TV in our homes, and some remember party lines on telephones. Rarely did we have more than one telephone or TV in our homes. We set what was called rabbit-ear antennae on top of the TV and moved them around to get a fairly good black-and-white picture.

Over the years, we became aware of technology seeping into our daily lives. Those of us fortunate enough to work where we learned our way around computers have a fair advantage over those who did not. We grew into the knowledge, making the advances less traumatic.

Even if senior citizens find technology confusing or frustrating, it can help some stay in their home longer and more safely. It’s called “aging in place,” meaning a person lives and ages in their residence of choice for as long as they are able.

Aging in place includes having services, care and needed support in the residence.

But the idea meets some hurdles in the health, social and emotional needs that must be addressed to help people maintain well-rounded lives.

The Upper Arlington (Ohio) Commission on Aging understands these challenges and offers an annual symposium on different topics to inform senior citizens.

This year, the topic is “Technology and Aging: What You Need to Know and What You Want to Know.”

Presentations will include “Aging and your Health Care” and “Aging in Place.”

This year’s symposium is set from 8:30 a.m. to 1 p.m Sept. 18 at Upper Arlington Lutheran Church, 2300 Lytham Road.

From 8:30 to 9 a.m., those who attend may view exhibits from technology groups, companies and other related sponsors with the Upper Arlington Commission on Aging.

The free event includes lunch.

Registration is required, and the deadline is Sept. 11. To register, call 614-407-5748 or go to uacoa.com and use the “contact us” form.

Featured speakers are Donna Matturri, technology and media librarian with the Upper Arlington Public Library, and Danielle Murphy, consumer educator from Attorney General David Yost’s office.

“We hear so much in the news about the worst possible outcomes in technology: identity theft, hacking, fake news,” Matturri said. “When you have to sort through all that negative noise, it feels nearly impossible to stay positive about using a smartphone or computer.

“Technology can connect us to family and friends (and help us make new friends), keep us organized, help us stay safe and active and, through your local library’s resources, entertain you.”

Murphy will inform guests about the Cybersecurity, Help, Information and Protection Program.

“The presentation is a basic educational session designed to help consumers stay safe in cyberspace,” she said. “As consumers of all ages rely more and more on technology, it is vital they understand how to protect their electronic devices and keep personal information private.”

Murphy said her presentation will focus on the importance of security and privacy, including the special challenges brought by mobile devices.

She will offer seniors practical security and privacy tips they can put to use and will provide copies of the CHIPP booklet to all who attend.

This booklet is available at ohioattorneygeneral.gov by clicking on “publications” and looking for the CHIPP under the “consumers” header. The booklet also can be ordered by calling 800-282-0515.

A panel, moderated by Age-Friendly Columbus, will feature representatives from Nesterly, Smart Columbus and Lyft.

The forum is open to all senior citizens.

Many find deep meaning in flag’s folds

Day by Day: Many find deep meaning in flag’s folds

By LIZ THOMPSON

July 7, 2019
This Week News

The Declaration of Independence, signed 243 years ago, declares: “We hold these truths to be self-evident, that all men are created equal, that they are endowed by their Creator with certain unalienable Rights, that among these are Life, Liberty and the pursuit of Happiness.”

Many celebrated the Fourth of July this month with parades, picnics, watching fireworks and displaying our flag in various ways.

We celebrated freedom.

In June, we watched as more than 100 D-Day survivors journeyed to France on the 75th anniversary of the largest amphibious invasion in U.S. history.

These surviving men said the real heroes were the young soldiers, ages 18 to 22 in 1944, who gave their lives for freedom. One said he hoped they taught in history books about the sacrifices these soldiers made so young people would understand why they enjoy today’s freedoms.

Displaying our country’s flag is one way to honor those who have served our country, either in the military or in civilian services such as police or fire departments.

During a flag ceremony, as veterans fold the banner, another veteran reads the meaning of why we fold it 13 times. There are several theories about its origin and several versions.

Lori Watson, owner of the Flag Lady’s Flag Store in Clintonville, said the shop offers a copy of the following with each flag sale:

* The first fold of our flag is a symbol of life.

* The second fold is a symbol of our belief in eternal life.

* The third fold is made in honor and remembrance of the veterans departing our ranks who gave a portion of their lives for the defense of our country to attain peace throughout the world.

* The fourth fold represents our weaker nature, for as American citizens trusting in God, it is to him we turn in times of peace as well as in times of war for his divine guidance.

* The fifth fold is a tribute to our country, for in the words of Stephen Decatur, “Our Country,” in dealing with other countries, may she always be right; but it is still our country, right or wrong.

* The sixth fold is for where our hearts lie. It is with our heart that we pledge allegiance to the flag of the United States of America, and to the republic for which it stands, one nation under God, indivisible, with liberty and justice for all.

* The seventh fold is a tribute to our armed forces, for it is through the armed forces that we protect our country and our flag against all her enemies, whether they are found within or without the boundaries of our republic.

* The eighth fold is a tribute to the one who entered into the valley of the shadow of death, that we might see the light of day.

* The ninth fold is a tribute to womanhood and mothers. For it has been through their faith, their love, loyalty and devotion that the character of the men and women who have made this country great has been molded.

* The 10th fold is a tribute to the father, for he, too, has given his sons and daughters for defense of our country since they were first born.

* The 11th fold represents the lower portion of the seal of King David and King Solomon and glorifies, in the Hebrews’ eyes, the God of Abraham, Isaac and Jacob.

* The 12th fold represents an emblem of eternity and glorifies, in the Christians’ eyes, God the Father, the Son and the Holy Spirit.

* The 13th fold, or when the flag is completely folded, the stars are uppermost, reminding us of our nation’s motto, “In God We Trust.”

* After the flag is completely folded and tucked in, it takes on the appearance of a cocked hat, reminding us of the soldiers who served under Gen. George Washington, and the sailors and marines who served under Capt. John Paul Jones, who were followed by their comrades and shipmates in the armed forces of the United States, preserving for us the rights, privileges and freedoms we enjoy today.

Enough said.

 

Grads found fulfilling paths, planned or not

Day by Day
Grads found fulfilling paths, planned or not

By Liz Thompson

Jun 16, 2019
This Week News

Fifty years ago this month, I was one of nearly 400 high school seniors from Westerville (South) High School (in Ohio) who marched to “Pomp and Circumstance” to receive our graduation certificates.

Looking back, my main regret is I did not ask for help in my studies. Instead, I relied on my music ability to get me through life and onto my goal to become a music teacher.

That never happened. Best-laid plans and all that. But I know I’m not alone.

My classmates have tried to keep track of each others’ whereabouts over the years, yet we have lost track of about 60. As far as we know, 81 live in 29 other states, one lives in Newfoundland, one in France and two in Japan.

In 50 years, we know 49 classmates have died.

Dee (Weaston) Standish was a classmate of mine from kindergarten on. She now lives in Marietta. Her best-laid plans worked for her.

“My career turned out just the way I hoped it would,” she said. “I became a teacher, allowing me to work with children every day. I was in education until I retired.

“My advice to graduating seniors is to follow your passion, and it will help you find fulfillment in your chosen career.”

Barbara (Ralston) Thurber and her husband have lived in Austin, Texas, for 30 years.

“I would tell a graduating senior that life is going to give them many challenges,” Thurber said.

Her life has been interesting as a nurse.

“I served in the Air Force and have worked at many different places,” she said. “I have used my knowledge to take care of myself, my mother with cancer and my three daughters.”

Now her health prevents her from traveling to Ohio for our 50-year reunion.

Classmate Jim Garvie, now in Oklahoma, said his high school days were riddled with poor grades and anonymity as an introvert.

“No one gave me an outlook into what I could be or what I could do in the future,” Garvie said. “The moment I graduated and went to Bowling Green State University, it all changed. Loved college life, less structure and a reason to enjoy life.”

As his grades improved, he became involved in sports for the first time and began a major in physical education and teaching.

He found coaching and teaching health, science and driver’s education fun.

“I cannot believe I ended up in a career where I was paid to have fun,” Garvie said. “It’s the last thing I ever thought I would do in life.”

He knew there were students in high school who were like him at that age – unmotivated and with no clear future ahead.

“In classes, I developed a reward system where kids that behaved and did their work could earn extra credit and get the grades they wanted,” he said. “In football, I was able to get them involved as a team manager or actually on the teams, even if they were not athletically gifted.”

As a result of his teaching and coaching, he was hired by the Department of Defense to teach and coach on military bases in Japan, South Korea and Italy.

Many of my classmates are grandparents and have life experiences we never thought possible 50 years ago.

We sent a reunion survey to learn what people wanted to happen at the event.

Most wanted time to casually visit and reconnect, see memorabilia of our high school days and walk through the school building. They would love to see teachers and let them know the impact they had on their lives.

Music of the 1960s will play; name badges will halt the awkward moments because we have all changed in appearance. Laughter and maybe tears will happen along with memories.

Classmates from Massachusetts, Nevada, Kentucky, Wisconsin and all around Ohio will gather Aug. 3 to celebrate the 50-year mark in our lives. More than once, we will say, “Has it really been 50 years?”

We learned from our experiences and are wiser for them.

Take heed, graduates. Time passes quickly.

Why we fold the flag 13 times

In honor of all our veterans on this Memorial Day

Why we fold the flag 13 times
https://www.americanflags.com/whywefofl13t

Have you ever noticed how the honor guard pays meticulous attention to correctly folding the American flag 13 times? Here’s what each of those 13 folds mean:

The 1st fold of our flag is a symbol of life.

The 2nd fold is a symbol of our belief in eternal life.

The 3rd fold is made in honor and remembrance of the veterans departing our ranks who gave a portion of their lives for the defense of our country to attain peace throughout the world.

The 4th fold represents our weaker nature, for as American citizens trusting in God, it is to Him we turn in times of peace as well as in time of war for His divine guidance.

The 5th fold is a tribute to our country, for in the words of Stephen Decatur, “Our Country”, in dealing with other countries, may she always be right; but it is still our country right or wrong.

The 6th fold is for where our hearts lie. It is with our heart that We pledge allegiance to the flag of the United States of America, and to the republic for which it stands, one Nation under God, Indivisible, with Liberty and Justice for all.

The 7th fold is a tribute to our Armed Forces, for it is through the Armed Forces that we protect our country and our flag against all her enemies, whether they be found within or without the boundaries of our republic.

The 8th fold is a tribute to the one who entered into the valley of the shadow of death, that we might see the light of day.

The 9th fold is a tribute to womanhood, and Mothers. For it has been through their faith, their love, loyalty and devotion that the character of the men and women who have made this country great has been molded.

The 10th fold is a tribute to the father, for he, too, has given his sons and daughters for defense of our country since they were first born.

The 11th fold represents the lower portion of the seal of King David and King Solomon and glorifies in the Hebrews’ eyes, the God of Abraham, Isaac and Jacob.

The 12th fold represents an emblem of eternity and glorifies, in the Christians’ eyes, God the Father, the Son, and Holy Spirit.

The 13th fold, or when the flag is completely folded, the stars are uppermost reminding us of our nation’s motto, “In God We Trust.”

After the flag is completely folded and tucked in, it takes on the appearance of a cocked hat, reminding us of the soldiers who served under General George Washington, and the Sailors and Marines who served under Captain John Paul Jones, who were followed by their comrades and shipmates in the Armed Forces of the United States, preserving for us the rights, privileges and freedoms we enjoy today.